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Off to Mitta Mitta... Events of the meeting......


Mitta Mitta had not seen good rain for sometime. The HU Meeting brought it for them. Saturday dawned clear. But we knew by the clouds in the distance that this would not last all day. Tent city out the back of the pub has started to grow.


A group ride had been arranged for Saturday morning up to Dartmouth Dam. The road was narrow and twisty. We had been warned about the gravel on the road. Did some of us remember? No. Helge was in front of me. I see him sliding. Then both of my wheels let go. The BM handles it well. Sideways and forwards and soon have grip again. Helge is now looking down at his back wheel for oil. It was not that. It was the gravel we forgot about. Fine ball bearing gravel. A few others got caught out on this corner too. No one came down. Shows how experienced the riders at this meet are.

Thanks to Daniel for the below photos. You can see the rest at Daniel's site.



You can tell how bad the drought is here in Australia when you see the dam levels. They are shockingly low.

Lilly and me made our way back down to Mitta Mitta from the dam. Off in a park was some of the earth equipment that was used to construct the dam. Huge bits of now rusting metal. The BM Tractor doing what it does best. Hauling large objects. ;-)

Some more to the bikes at the meet. These 3 are all from Europe.

Robin Box from Touratech/Safari Tanks.

A few hours after everyone was back from the ride the rain came. Heavy rain. Rain that could have an Ark built for it. This did not stop us all going up to the Community Hall for the presentations of Saturday night. Well it was only a few 100 meters up the road.

Margaret Peart gave a power point presentation on her Iron Butt rides in the USA. Wonderful phottos. How she finds time to take photos when she has to do 1000 miles in 24 hours I don't know. But she does. She used an F650 BM and R1200GS BM in the USA. Now she is off around the world on a V-Strom. Go girl.

Over the course of the weekend many presentation where held. Lilly and I did not attend them all.

* RTW on an Iron Butt
o Margaret Peart
...or how to combine RTW-ing with Iron Butt endurance riding - and still manage to see things.
* South and Central America, alone or two bikes?
o Roly Gough-Allen
Buenos Aries to San Diego in 4 months 11 weeks with a mate, and 7 weeks alone, pro's and con's of each!
* Getting ready to go - where do you start?
o John & Alanna Skillington
Some practical planning tips for organising the big trip.
* Planning Europe & Russia
o Michael & Colleen Tharme
How we planned our 2008 trip to Moscow from London on 1200GS two up.
* Equipment - the good the bad and the ugly
o Chris Cowper
Some of the gear I used, and should not have used.
* China and Russia 2008
o Garry Chadwick
Vietnam to Italy on a maxi-scooter and a local Chinese 125
* Riding Mongolia
o Scott Weinhold
Advice and inspiration for riding across Mongolia, the best country in the world for offroad travel.
* London to Vladivostok for charity
o Mick McDonald
The pros and cons of riding for charity
* Central America
o Ben Holland
Solo in Central America
* For Women Only
o Panel discussion.

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